Print runs for El Banco de Santa Eulalia

The following table gives the printing details from the American Bank Note CompanyThe American Bank Note Company was formed from an association of seven competing companies on 29 April 1858. The creation was well received by the banks and companies that were its principal clients because it promised stability, continuity and security, which users of documents of value had long desired. As well as United States currency, by the later part of the nineteenth century the company was engraving and printing currency and other high-security items for forty-eight countries.
The 25c face and back plates (10 notes on each) and one 25c tint plate; 50c face and back plates (10 notes on each) and one 50c tint plate; and $1 face and back plates (6 notes on each) and two $1 tint plates were engraved on an order of 23 September 1875. The 25c face plate, 50c face plate and $1 face plate were altered on an order of 2 May 1882 by changing the Series from “A” to “B” and engraving one signature.
The $5 face and back plates (2 notes on each) and one $5 tint plate (2 notes) and $10 face and back plates (2 notes on each) and one $10 tint plate (2 notes) were engraved on an order of 14 September 1882.
On 14 February 1932 the American Bank Note Company cancelled the plates (ABNC)
.

 25c50c$1$5$10
1875 Sept 60,000 50,000 60,000    
1880 Feb 10,000 30,000      
Sept 20,000 10,000 10,000    
1881 July   20,000 20,000    
1882 May 40,000 40,000 5,000    
Sept       10,000 5,000
1885 Nov 40,000 30,000 25,000    
1886 June 20,000 15,000 12,500    
           
Total 190,000 195,000 132,500 10,000 5,000

For the three lowest values the 1875, 1880 and 1881 printings were series A, whilst the 1882, 1885 and 1886 printings were series B. According to the ABNC proofs of the 25c and 50c values, it would seem that Series A and the 1882 Series B had blue numbers, whilst the other two years have red numbers, and that the 1886 printing can be distinguished from the 1885 printing by its darker background colour. The $1 notes had red numbers from 1875 until 1885(?) and blue numbers in 1886(?), with the 1885 print having a darker background than the 1882 print. The five pesos notes were Series C and the ten pesos also Series C.

All this can be summarised as follows:

ValuePrint DateQuantityBackground
colour
SeriesColour
of
serial
letter
fromto 
1c               authorised, but possibly not issued
5c 1884           7489 highest known number
10c 1884           4180 highest known number
25c 1875 Sep 60,000   A blue 00001 60000  
1880 Feb 10,000   A blue 50001 60000 according to the ABNC records serial numbers A 50001 to 60000 were printed with the wrong colour underprint
1880 Sep 20,000   A blue 60001 80000  
1882 May 40,000 darker B blue 00001 20000  
  B   00001 20000 the duplication of serial numbers was a bank request
1885 Nov 40,000   B red 00001 40000  
1886 Jun 20,000 darker B red 40001 60000  
50c 1875 Sep 50,000   A blue 00001 50000  
1880 Feb 30,000   A blue 20001 50000  
1880 Sep 10,000   A blue 50001 60000  
1881 Jul 20,000   A blue 40001 60000  
1882 May 40,000 darker B blue 00001 20000  
      00001 20000 the duplication of serial numbers was a bank request
1885 Nov 30,000   B red 00001 30000  
1886 Jun 15,000 darker B red 30001 45000  
$1 1875 Sep 60,000   A red 00001 60000  
1880 Sep 10,000   A red 40001 50000  
1881 Jul 20,000   A red 30001 50000  
1882 May 30,000   B red 00001 15000  
      00001 15000 the duplication of serial numbers was a bank request
1885 Nov 25,000 darker B red(?) 00001 25000  
1886 Jun 12,500   B blue 25001 37500  
$5 1882 Sep 10,000   C   00001 10000  
$10 1882 Sep 5,000   C   00001 5000  

Withdrawal of notes

On 13 October 1888 the Secretaría de Hacienda gave the Banco de Santa Eulalia six months to call in their notes. The bank’s directors had to produce a list of the notes in circulation within two weeks, and make public announcements of their intention to withdraw their notes. They then had to give a weekly report to the Secretaría of the number of notes cancelled.

On 22 October 1888, in response to a request by the bank’s president, Tomás Macmanus, the date on which to begin withdrawing its notes was put back to 1 January 1889: this was then postponed again until 1 March, and finally to 1 April, by which time the bank had negotiated the contract for the new Banco Comercial.

Incinerations

The Secretaria de Hacienda admitted that it did not know how many notes the bank had issuedMemoria de la Secretaría de Hacienda correspondiente al ejercicio fiscal de 1884 á 1885, Mexico, 1885.

Under the terms of the concession for the new Banco Comercial, all the Banco de Santa Eulalia notes were withdrawn and burnt. On 30 November 1889 $56,500 in notes were incinerated in front of the Administrador de Rentas del Estado Memoria de las Instituciones de Crédito Correspondiente a los años de 1897, 1898, y 1899: on 12 September 1890 $60,000 were incinerated, and the bank expected them all to go by NovemberEl Siglo Diez y Nueve, Mexico City, 17 September 1890. These may have been included in the later $108,000 total; on 27 September 1890 $108,000 were destroyed in the presence of Miguel Ahumada, the Interventor, and finally $26,000 were destroyed on 7 January 1892, again in Ahumada’s presence Memoria de las Instituciones de Crédito Correspondiente a los años de 1897, 1898, y 1899. So we have records of a total of $250,500 being destroyed.

On 9 June 1892 the firm of F. Macmanus é hijos asked holders of any remaining notes to present them as soon as possible at their offices at calle Ojinaga 20El Estado de Chihuahua, 11 June 1892.